The Direct Network


Why Now? The Adoption Answers You Need for Faculty

Posted by Lori Reese on Mar 28, 2018 5:31:00 AM

It’s a distraction, an onerous bit of red tape or just an abstract requirement that seems out-of-step with classroom reality: Your earnest early-adoption notice ends up deleted, routed to junk mail or ignored because faculty don’t understand why you’re sending requests out so early.  If you want teachers to cooperate with the official bookstore schedule, it’s critical to anticipate their questions, understand confusion and offer succinct, concrete answers.

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Social Media in a K–12 Environment: The Pros and Cons

Posted by Liz Schulte on Mar 13, 2018 5:30:00 AM

Social media has undeniable popularity. With the majority of U.S. adults on at least one platform, social media is becoming deeply ingrained into our culture and means of communication. How does it affect K–12 schools and teachers? Where can social media offer benefits to the classroom? Where can it fall short?

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Winning Faculty Allies in the Struggle for Affordable Course Material Solutions

Posted by Lori Reese on Jan 22, 2018 5:30:00 AM

Would you like to know how and why faculty treat textbooks the way they do? According to our report, “Winning Faculty Allies in the Struggle for Affordable Course Material Solutions,” many teachers are emperors of their classrooms: They select their books with a keen interest in maintaining academic freedom — and they don’t expect input from others.

Find out how faculty choices affect the cost of education and how your administration can win allies in reducing course material costs in this exclusive report.

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5 Ways You Need to Ensure Your Committees Are Vibrant and Productive

Posted by Lori Reese on Jan 11, 2018 5:30:00 AM

Are your committees truly committees? Are they environments that draw on dynamic discussion and teamwork to resolve tenacious institutional problems? Or are they dominated by a single talker, and undone by the glaze in other members’ eyes as they fidget and not-so-inconspicuously check the time. Are they vibrant fonts of creativity or cesspools of politics, gossip and dissent-for-its-own-sake? Most importantly, are they generating buy-in for new initiatives, or are they simply an academic ritual — a proforma waste of time?

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Virtually Confused: How to Talk Digital With Faculty

Posted by Lori Reese on Dec 13, 2017 5:30:00 AM

When faculty adopt low-cost digital options like inclusive access or alternative content, it serves the official school bookstore. Even if it doesn’t boost overall revenues, students are more likely to purchase the lower-priced texts on time. When students have required materials, their grades improve, retention increases and the school reaps the reward of a reliable revenue stream. There’s only one problem: too many faculty members aren’t aware of digital options. That places the onus on administrators to educate teachers.

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Is Your Administration Cutting Costs or Creating Them?

Posted by Lori Reese on Oct 27, 2017 5:30:00 AM

“People in those staff jobs have it made,” my friend said, rolling her eyes. “They get paid really well and do nothing.

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How Social Media Adds Value to K–12 Education

Posted by Liz Schulte on Oct 26, 2017 5:30:00 AM

Students live on social media. Their smartphones have become a natural extension of their arm at increasingly younger ages. There is a world of information at their fingertips. Want to learn how to code? Hear about the latest video game? World events? Pretty much anything you can think of, there is a YouTube video for that. But, who is teaching children to spot the real sites from the fake ones? How will they critically assess what is fact and what is opinion? How do students defend themselves against online bullying or prevent themselves from becoming the bully? In short, where do children learn digital citizenship?

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